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Meningitis - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What is meningitis? Meningitis describes inflammation of the meninges, the protective membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 222297 Osmosis
Histopathology Brain, cerebrum--Cryptococcosis (PAS stain)
 
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Histopathology Brain, cerebrum--Cryptococcosis (PAS stain)
Views: 8172 WashingtonDeceit
Bacterial fungal and paracitis infection of the CNS
 
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Radiology, central nervous system, infections, mri, ct scan, dr. Ahmed D. Abdulwahab, rizgary, journal club, residents
MSGERC 2016 Biennial Meeting -Cryptococcus : Tom Harrison
 
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Plenary Lectures: Cryptocococus - Tom Harrison: Cryptococcal Meningitis Update from Resource-Limited Setting Perspective: Epidemiology, Treatment and Prevention
I got a Brain Infection from My Neurosurgeon Dr. Melvin Field at Florida Hospital Orlando
 
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MY NAME IS JOHN SCOTT CONOVER, I MADE THIS VIDEO TO EDUCATE THE PUBLIC OF WHAT YOU MAY BE SUBJECTED TO AS I WAS, TO AN UNSTERILE OPERATING ROOM AT FLORIDA HOSPITAL OF ORLANDO !! I have undergone 2 brain operations at Florida Hospital of Orlando between 2012 and 2017. In June 2012, Neurosurgeon Dr. Melvin Fields performed a botched brain operation on me. Approx. 4 months after, I returned to Florida Hospital of Orlando with a severe infection in my head. The incision site had broken down from the infection and pus, blood, and CSF fluid was oozing out of the incision. This has been an ongoing reoccurring issue for the last five years continuously. I have sought help many times at Florida Hospital of Orlando when the pus and CSF are oozing from the incision site. Each time I was admitted and administered antibiotics from the ICU and then sent home within 3-5 days. Approximately 7 months ago, I was readmitted with a severe infection at the incision site. I was admitted immediately. I was prepped for an operation the following morning. The goal was to eradicate the germ that was inside my head by removing the graft on my skull and the mesh. Hopefully. Approx 3 months after this botched life and death operation, I had returned to the ER with a severe infection at the incision site Again.. With my insistence, prior to administering antibiotics, the ER doctor at Florida Hospital of Orlando sent the specimen for culture to the lab. A day and a half later, the PA came into my room in the ICU and asked me how I was doing. I asked her what kind of infection did I have. She stated Lets see. As she looked at the computer she noticed that Dr. Fields had not ordered the specimen to be cultured as usual. So she herself ordered the labwork to be done. The following day I was released from the ICU and sent home with 28 tablets of Keflex in 750 mg. Approximately, three to five days later, my daughter went down to Florida Hospital of Orlando, and got all the test results from the records department. Upon receiving these records we were shocked to find out that I had tested positive for rare gram cocci, and I had no graft on the rear of my skull or a mesh protecting it. This infection was less than 1 millimeter from my brain, and it could have killed me instantly. To this day, I have never received a call from Florida Hospital of Orlando or the so-called neurosurgeons, that I was being treated by, to find out how I was feeling and to inform me that I had tested positive for rare gram cocci. I have sent eight emails over a period of 3 months, and two hand delivered letters to the administration, and to the C.E.O. of Florida Hospital of Orlando, and to the board members begging and pleading for someone from this administration to supersede in this matter and I have never been contacted except from their Risk Management Officer. This is extremely sad that this kind of medical treatment is being allowed in 2017. I released this video to educate the people of what kind of unsterile, unsanitary conditions that you may be subjected to while getting an operation at Florida Hospital of Orlando, while you are lying unconscious in their operating room at the hands of a sloppy, dirty Neurosurgeon that doesn't scrub up and assumes that the rules and regulations of the board of medicine doesn't apply to him. Every day I suffer from severe, debilitating headaches, dizziness, and nausea along with the occasional CSF and pus oozing from my right side of my head and my ear, and my face becoming swollen from the collection of CSF, while Florida Hospital of Orlando and Neurosurgeon Dr. Melvin Field refuse to acknowledge it. They blackballed me and have left me Abandoned with an infection inside my head that I will live with the rest of my life. - SCOTT PLEASE EDUCATE YOURSELF ON THIS CATASTROPHIC ISSUE!!
Views: 397 John Conover
Pneumonia - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What is pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that can be caused by a variety of different pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 295161 Osmosis
Acute Pyogenic Bacterial Meningitis Part 1
 
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Watch 800+ videos on Basic Sciences & Clinical Medicine at https://www.DrNajeebLectures.com. New videos every 3 days with download option. Master Medical Sciences with Dr. Najeeb. World's Most Popular Medical Lectures. Trusted by 1M+ Medical, Dentistry, Nursing & Pharmacy students in 190 countries. ──────────────────────────── OFFICIAL LINKS: Website: https://www.DrNajeebLectures.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrNajeeb Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/DrNajeebLectures Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/DrNajeeb Android App: http://bit.ly/dr-najeeb-android ───────────────── OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL ───────────────── Here on YouTube, we only upload free sample videos. If you like these videos you can check out our entire video library on our website at https://www.DrNajeebLectures.com. We have over 800+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences & Clinical Medicine and over 1M+ members from 190 countries. ────────────────────── WHY SIGN UP FOR MEMBERSHIP? ────────────────────── ► 800+ Medical Lectures. ► Basic Medical Sciences. ► Clinical Medicine. ► New videos every week in HD. ► Download videos for offline access. ► Fast video playback (0.5x - 2x) ► Watch videos on any device. ► Fanatic customer support. ► Trusted by 1 million students. Learn more at https://www.DrNajeebLectures.com
Views: 81673 Dr. Najeeb Lectures
Cerebellopontine Angle Dermoid
 
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This is a case of a left cerebellopontine angle dermoid. There is a nonenhancing T1-isointense lesion with lobular margins in the left cerebellopontine angle. The lesion is T2-hyperintense with scattered cystic components. It extends to the posterior margin of the porus acoustics and minimally extends into the left internal auditory canal. The lesion is FLAIR-hyperintense and mildly restrict diffusion. The dermoid represents an inclusion of ecteodermal tissues within the CNS. Dermoids contain squamous epithelium and associated dermal appendages. Dermoids are typically hyperintense on T1, heterogeneous on T2, and with a striated or layered appearance. The differential diagnosis includes craniopharyngioma, arachnoid cyst, and lipoma. Dermoids are usually well circumscribed while epidermoids are more amorphous.
Views: 84 CTisus
Histopathology Brain--Arteriovenous malformation
 
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Histopathology Brain--Arteriovenous malformation
Views: 10806 WashingtonDeceit
Tuberculous Meningitis: Optimizing the clinical management and outcome in Indonesia
 
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Tuberculous Meningitis: Optimizing the clinical management and outcome in Indonesia by Sofiati Dian "Tuberculosis (TB) is second only to HIV as the greatest killer worldwide due to a single infectious agent. ... TB meningitis (TB of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord) is the most severe form of TB, resulting in death or neurological disability in up to 50% of patients or more. ... TB meningitis is relatively rare (1-5% of all TB cases) but due to its high mortality it accounts for a significant number of deaths, also among patients treated in the Netherlands." (http://www.ru.nl/sociology/@870939/intensified/) Pada sesi Nijmegen Ceria kali ini, dr. Sofiati Dian akan menyampaikan mengenai Tuberculosis Meningitis (TBM). Kenapa TBM ini penting untuk diinvestigasi? Salah satunya karena TBM bisa mengenai siapa pun--anak-anak, dewasa, kurus, gendut --jadi musti diwaspadai betul. Sebagai tambahan tentang pentingnya mengenal TBM ini, saat ini salah satu mahasiswa magister indonesia di Wageningen University sedang dirawat di rumah sakit khusus TB, Dekkerswald, Groesbeek. Hal ini terjadi, salah satunya, karena terlambat didiagnosis TBM.
MRI findings in CNS tuberculosis (Part 2)
 
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Learning Objectives 1. To give information about the characteristics of the MRI signs of the CNS tuberculosis in Peruvian patients. 2. To understand the accuracy of the MRI signs in CNS tuberculosis. 3. To show MRI images of CNS tuberculosis simulating other pathologies. Abstract In Peru, tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity in the group of young adults, 82% of TB cases reported in 2013 and 2014 primarily affected the lungs. 77% of cases were diagnosed with pulmonary TB smear positive and nearly 40% with smear with a high bacillary load (2-3 crosses). Almost 18% of cases of extra pulmonary tuberculosis and pleural location had the highest percentage (54%), lymph nodes (11.1%) and meningeal/nervous system (9%) was reported. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been shown to be superior to CT in evaluating patients with suspected meningitis and its associated complications. Complications of meningitis include hydrocephalus, vasculitis, cranial nerve involvement, and associated multiple tuberculomas. Tuberculomas are among the most common intracranial mass lesions and the most common manifestation of parenchymal TB and less than 2 to 3 cm in size. Tuberculous abscess are generally larger. In tuberculous spondylodiscitis, MR imaging is currently the imaging modality of choice, given its superior ability in the detection of soft tissue and bone marrow changes. Finally, numerous conditions can mimic tuberculomas on conventional imaging. Other imaging techniques such as diffusion imaging, perfusion and MR spectroscopy may help in differentiating these conditions.
Views: 453 C R