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How mountaintop mining affects life and landscape in West Virginia
 
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Deep layers of underground coal are all but gone in West Virginia after 200 years of relentless mining, leaving thinner seams of coal on top of the state's beautiful mountains. But surface mining carries a huge cost: nothing less than mountains themselves. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien reports on how the Appalachian landscape is being fundamentally and irrevocably changed.
Views: 31604 PBS NewsHour
Blowing Up Mountains: Destroying the Environment for Coal
 
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Massive corporations are blowing up mountains and creating environmental ruins in West Virginia. All this devastation, just to extract some coal. We went to West Virginia to investigate mountain-top removal -- which a way of extracting coal from deposits under mountains. Instead of drilling into the mountain and sending men underground to take out the coal in the traditional way, they just take the whole top of a mountain off. Hosted by Derrick Beckles | Originally aired on http://VICE.com in 2009 Watch more VICE documentaries here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Presents Subscribe for videos that are actually good: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/vice/videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com
Views: 325653 VICE
Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes
 
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In Appalachia, coal companies blow the tops off of mountains to get at the coal. The damage this does to the surrounding environment and water supply is devastating. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About From The Ashes: From the Ashes captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry and what its future should be in the current political climate. From Appalachia to the West’s Powder River Basin, the film goes beyond the rhetoric of the “war on coal” to present compelling and often heartbreaking stories about what’s at stake for our economy, health, and climate. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes https://youtu.be/ynN39sfqT8w National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 78717 National Geographic
Mountaintop Removal: An American Tragedy
 
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Narrated by Susan Sarandon, this video shows firsthand footage of mountaintop removal coal mining and its impacts on Appalachian mountains, drinking water and families. Mountaintop removal is a mining practice where explosives are used to blast the tops off mountains to expose the thin seams of coal beneath. Once blasted, earth and coal dust from the mountaintop is dumped into neighboring valleys and waterways. Hundreds of mountaintops have been lost forever to MTR, and according to a 2005 environmental impact statement, nearly 2,000 miles of Appalachian streams have already been buried or contaminated by the devastating mining practice. Take action today and tell banks to stop financing this American tragedy at http://ran.org/mtrbanks
Mountaintop Removal: Background
 
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This video gives background information on Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining and was created for a project in Environmental Engineering 1. The purpose was for background only--no information on the effects are shown, although the impacts of Mountaintop Removal (both on humans and on the environment) are significant and negative. Please watch and leave a comment for me! The information in this video was obtained from: http://mountainjustice.org/facts/steps.php ; information about the impacts of Mountaintop Removal can also be found there.
Views: 1005 lcelestej
Hearing: Federal Government Must Study Health Impact of Mountaintop Removal Mining
 
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A Congressional hearing this morning focused in part on efforts by Congressman John Yarmuth (KY-3) and others to study the health consequences of mountaintop removal coal mining. Displaying a bottle of contaminated water from the well of the Urias family in Eastern Kentucky, Yarmuth questioned Dr. Matthew Wasson, director of programs for Appalachian Voices, about the need for such a study. The hearing took place in the House Committee on Energy and Commerce's Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy. "They don't need a website in their community to know there's a health problem associated with that water," Yarmuth said of those who live near mountaintop removal mining sites. "If that were the drinking water here in Congress, we not only wouldn't drink it -- we would not stand for it." Despite more than 20 peer-reviewed studies showing correlations between increased health risks and mountaintop removal mining, the federal government has yet to conduct a single study on the health consequences of the practice, in which coal operators use heavy machinery and explosives to remove upper levels of mountains and access coal seams beneath. These operations often result in contamination of surrounding land and water supplies. This Congress, Yarmuth introduced H.R. 526, the Appalachian Community Health Emergency (ACHE) Act, which would halt permits for mountaintop removal mining operations until the federal government can study its health impacts on nearby communities and declare the practice safe. According to recent peer-reviewed research, people living near mountaintop removal coal mining sites have increased rates of cancer, birth defects, and mortality. Additionally, an analysis in the journal Science found communities near mountaintop removal coal mining sites experience higher rates of chronic heart, lung, and kidney disease, as well as higher levels of adult hospitalizations for chronic pulmonary disorders and hypertension.
Views: 637 RepJohnYarmuth
The Coal Mine Next Door: The Deregulation of Mountaintop Removal
 
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The Trump administration and United States Congress have endangered public health by ending measures, including defunding a scientific study, that address the human and environmental risks of mountaintop removal, a form of surface coal mining prevalent in central Appalachia.
Views: 992 HumanRightsWatch
Scientists Seek Ban on Mountaintop Mining
 
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For more videos, go to http://news.discovery.com/videos/discovery-news-earth/. Mountaintop mining causes permanent damage to the environment and exposes people to serious health risks, says a new report by a leading group of scientists. Jorge Ribas reports.
Views: 10775 Discovery
Mountaintop Mining The Good, Bad & Ugly
 
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APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS, W. Va. -- The United States is known as the Saudi Arabia of coal, with over 50 percent of our electricity generated by this abundant natural resource. Coal also generates tremendous controversy. Much of the debate centers not on pollution, but getting the coal out of the ground.
Views: 3845 Boonedog Music
How Does Mining Affect the Environment? You'll Be Shocked to Know
 
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Find more effects of mining right here: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/how-does-mining-affect-the-environment.html Mining is the source of all the substances that cannot be obtained by industrial processes or through agriculture. Mining reaps huge profits for the companies that own them and provides employment to a large number of people. It is also a huge source of revenue for the government. Despite its economic importance, the effects of mining on the environment is a pressing issue. Mining activities require the clearing of large areas of land. The chemicals used in the mining process often escape into the environment causing pollution. Watch this video to know how mining affects the environment.
Views: 19874 Buzzle
Markey: Mountain Top Removal Mining Destroys Environment, Harms Public Health - Feb. 3, 2016
 
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The Senate Environment and Public Works (EPW) Committee held an oversight hearing on Wednesday, Feb. 3 at 9:30 AM EST entitled, The Stream Protection Rule: Impacts on the Environment and Implications for Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act Implementation. The purpose of the hearing is to examine the implications and environmental impacts of the Office of Surface Mining’s proposed Stream Protection Rule as it relates to the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act.
Views: 129 Senator Markey
Judy Bonds on Mountain Top Removal and its impacts
 
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Judy covers the event that made her an activist, about the impacts that MTR is having on the communities of West Virginia as well as on what they need to successfully stop MTR
Mountaintop Removal
 
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In Appalachia, a last-minute change in mining rules by the Bush Administration affects how coal companies can dump debris in watersheds--a major environmental impact from mountaintop removal mining operations.
Views: 28 ThisAmericanLand
mountaintop removal fox environmental science
 
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Sources: Clean coal technology. Washington, D.C.: Dept. of Energy, Assistant Secretary, Management and Administration, Procurement and Assistance Management, Office of Procurement Operations, 1986. Print. "Ecological Impacts of Mountaintop Removal." Appalachian Voices RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 Apr. 2014. "Finding Coal Products in Your Home."Finding Coal Products in Your Home. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 Apr. 2014. McNeil, Bryan T. Combating mountaintop removal in the fight against big coal. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. Print. April 1, 2014. "Mountaintop Removal 101." Appalachian Voices RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Mar. 2014. "Mountaintop removal mining." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 31 Mar. 2014. Web. 1 Apr. 2014. "When Mountains Move." Mountaintop Removal Article, Coal Mining Information, Coal Industry Facts. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Mar. 2014.
Views: 16 sam gilbert
Coal Mining Effects
 
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Video showing the aftermath of coal mining
Views: 24446 Dasberry315
Explosion: Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining
 
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http://www.milesfrommaybe.com/ By Chad Stevens
Views: 16577 iLoveMountainsOrg
Mountain Top Removal
 
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In Appalachia, a last-minute change in mining rules by the Bush Administration affects how coal companies can dump debris in watersheds -- a major environmental impact from mountaintop-removal mining operations. Visit AssignmentEarth.org to learn more!
Views: 1816 AssignmentEarth
Coal Mining and the Environment
 
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Warren Wilson College students on a coal mining (Mountain top removal) tour in Eastern Kentucky.
Views: 761 CrownZed
Impacts of Mining
 
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beneath the surface COMMUNITY SOLUTIONS FOR THE GLOBAL MINING THREAT Project Vision: Preventing Human Rights Abuses Related to Mining The objective of this multi-­‐year project is to build a multimedia toolkit that educates, empowers, and connects communities impacted by extractive industries. The toolkit aims to stop human rights abuses before they occur and to put communities in a strong position to protect their rights and fight for justice. The project uses videos to share stories and practical advice from communities already impacted by mining with communities where mining will soon occur. These stories will form the foundation of a video toolkit that provides communities with strategies and techniques for protecting their rights, and inspires them to action. Cutting Edge Tools for Community Organizations All videos will be published with a facilitator’s guide to help maximize the impact of video screenings and support communities in taking meaningful action. Videos will be distributed on DVDs, USBs, and online, along with links to relevant guides and further information on key topics and strategies covered in the videos. Key partners will also be provided with projection equipment and hands-­‐on training to launch their grassroots distribution program. Video Collection: Year 1 ● The Impacts of Mining (Peru, Democratic Republic of Congo, Zimbabwe) ● Baseline Data and Environmental Monitoring (Nigeria) ● Community Mapping and Resistance to Mining (Ghana) ● Building a Resistance Movement (Peru, forthcoming) ● Negotiating for Environmental Protections (Bolivia, forthcoming) ● Resettlement and Relocation (Zimbabwe, forthcoming) Iteration & Year 2 The second phase of our project emphasizes distribution, feedback, and iteration. We will hold special screenings with target audiences in Haiti, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and other countries where mining poses an imminent threat. We are also seeking feedback from experts and practitioners on how to improve the content, and our distribution and implementation strategy. Get Involved! If you’re interested in collaborating on the project, hosting a screening, or providing advice or feedback, please contact Jessie Landerman at [email protected]
Professor Pat McGinley - Valley Fills and their Environmental Impacts
 
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Professor Pat McGinley, Charles H. Haden II Professor of Law at West Virginia University College of Law, discusses the legal regime that authorizes valley fills from mountaintop removal mining, and the environmental impacts of the fills. He is interviewed by Steve Johnson, an environmental law professor at Mercer Law School.
Views: 37 Stephen Johnson
How Coal Harms Our Health: Misti O'Quinn of "From the Ashes"
 
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This short video from ATTN: features Misti O'Quinn from our new documentary, "From the Ashes." Misti discusses the harmful impact coal pollution has on the health of her children. Learn more about the film here: http://www.fromtheashesfilm.com
Fight against Mountaintop coal removal
 
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The Struggle Against Mountaintop Removal: Leading Activist Mike Roselle Continues Fight Against Destructive Coal Mining The Environmental Protection Agency recently dealt a blow to the coal mining industry when it delayed hundreds of mountaintop coal mining projects for a new review of their environmental impact. But the EPA decision still leaves in place hundreds of existing permits for mountaintop removal. The group Climate Ground Zero has been leading protests and peaceful direct actions against the company Massey Energy to prevent mountaintop removal at Coal River Mountain in West Virginia. We speak with leading activist Mike Roselle of Climate Ground Zero. [includes rush transcript]
Views: 781 Donovon Ceaser
Exploring Mountaintop Removal with SouthWings
 
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Fly along with Tom White of SouthWings as we explore the devastation in the southern part of our state caused by mountaintop removal. This method of mining has not only caused irreversible damage to the environment, but it has contaminated the well water of families across Appalachia and caused unthinkable sickness and strife.
Leveling Appalachia: The Legacy of Mountaintop Removal Mining
 
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Citation: Yale Environment 360 and MediaStorm (Producers). (2009, October13). Leveling Appalachia: The Legacy of Mountaintop Removal Mining [Video file]. Retrieved from http:__e360.yale.edu_feature_leveling_appalachia_the_legacy_of_mountaintop_removal_mining_2198_
Views: 2288 Kirkland5234
Mining
 
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019 - Mining In this video Paul Andersen explains how mining is used to extract valuable minerals from the Earth's crust. Surface and subsurface mining are used to extract ore which is then processed. A discussion of ecosystem impacts and legislation is also included. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Cateb, M. (2010). Português: Cobre e latão para soldas. Lingote de prata 950 e chapa de prata. Liga para ser adicionada à prata, com cobre e germânio. Grânulos de prata fina. Foto : Mauro Cateb, joalheiro brasileiro. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Metals_for_jewellery.jpg English: Anthracite coal. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_anthracite.jpg File:MKingHubbert.jpg. (2011, September 13). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:MKingHubbert.jpg&oldid=450215564 Jones, N. (2007). English: Sand and gravel strata on the southern edge of Coxford Wood The sand and gravel quarry goes right up to the edge of wood. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sand_and_gravel_strata_on_the_southern_edge_of_Coxford_Wood_-_geograph.org.uk_-_610732.jpg Jyi1693. (2006). English: Seawater photographed from aboard the MV Virgo out of Singapore, 2006. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sea_water_Virgo.jpg KVDP. (2009). English: A schematic showing the locations of certain ores in the world. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Simplified_world_mining_map_1.png printer, -G. F. Nesbitt & Co. (1850). English: Sailing card for the clipper ship California, depicting scenes from the California gold rush. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:California_Clipper_500.jpg USA, G. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Italiano: Grafico che rappresenta il picco di Hubbert della produzione petrolifera mondiale. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_world_2004.svg Vance, R. H. (1850). English: “Photomechanical reproduction of the 1850(?) daguerreotype by R. H. Vance shows James Marshall standing in front of Sutter’s sawmill, Coloma, California, where he discovered gold.” Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sutters_Mill.jpg
Views: 82921 Bozeman Science
Mountaintop Removal: An American Tragedy
 
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Narrated by Susan Sarandon, this video shows firsthand footage of mountaintop removal coal mining and its impacts on Appalachian mountains, drinking water and families. Mountaintop removal is a mining practice where explosives are used to blast the tops off mountains to expose the thin seams of coal beneath. Once blasted, earth and coal dust from the mountaintop is dumped into neighboring valleys and waterways. Hundreds of mountaintops have been lost forever to MTR, and according to a 2005 environmental impact statement, nearly 2,000 miles of Appalachian streams have already been buried or contaminated by the devastating mining practice. Thanks to the Rainforest Action Network (RAN) for permission.
Views: 309 theallianceforappal
Bloody Coal
 
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How does mountaintop removal affect the environment? Mountaintop Removal is occurring right at the heart of one of the nations main hotspots of biological diversity. According to the Nature Conservancy, the mountain region including southwest Virginia, southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and northeastern Tennessee contains some of the highest levels of biological diversity in the nation. This region is also at the headwaters of the drinking water supplies of many US cities. The maps below show hotspots of biodiversity based on a rarity-weighted index biological diversity produced by the Nature Conservancy, as well as the major river systems with headwaters in the Appalachian coalfields. Unfortunately, there is little information on the cumulative impacts of mountaintop removal because the federal agencies that are charged with regulating coal mining have refused to track the overall extent and impacts of mountaintop removal. The one attempt at acomprehensive analysis of MTR by government agencies was presented in a multi-agency Environmental Impact Statement that was completed in 2003. This effort was initiated in the late 90s, but the focus of the EIS was revised after the White House changed hands in 2001. According to the Charleston Gazette: When it formally kicked off the project in February 1999, the EPA said the goal was to consider developing agency policies to minimize, to the maximum extent practicable the adverse environmental effects of mountaintop removal. By October 2001, then-Deputy Interior Secretary Steven J. Griles, a former mining industry lobbyist, had ordered the project refocused toward centralizing and streamlining coal mine permitting. Cindy Tibbot, a FWS biologist involved in the EIS process, was one of many agency scientists who expressed outrage about Griles directive, stating in an internal memo: Its hard to stay quiet about this when I really believe were doing the public and the heart of the Clean Water Act a great disservice. As Tibbot put it, the only alternatives offered in Griles proposed EIS would be: alternative locations to house the rubber stamp that issues the [mining] permits. While the EIS did compile a lot of disparate information on the effects and extent of MTR, the analysis was based on mining permit maps. According to satellite analysis done by Michael Shank at the TAGIS center of the West Virginia DEP, however, those permit maps are underestimating the extent of valley fill in 6 West Virginia coal counties by about 40%. Thus, the entire EIS is based on verifiably faulty data. Despite its many flaws, however, the multi-agency environmental impact statement did provide some useful information on the extent and impacts of mountaintop removal. Here are some of the impacts and concerns expressed in the final EPA report: More than 7 percent of Appalachian forests have been cut down and more than 1,200 miles of streams across the region have been buried or polluted between 1985 and 2001. Over 1000 miles of streams have been permitted to be buried in valley fills. (for scale, this is a greater distance than the length of the entire Ohio River). Mountaintop removal mining, if it continues unabated, will cause a projected loss of more than 1.4 million acres by the end of the decade-an area the size of Delaware-with a concomitant severe impact on fish, wildlife, and bird species, not to mention a devastating effect on many neighboring communities. 800+ square miles of mountains are estimated to be already destroyed. (this is equal to a one-quarter mile wide swath of destruction from New York to San Francisco - it is also significantly underestimated). Other quotes from the 2003 report include: … studies found that the natural return of forests to mountaintop mines reclaimed with grasses under hay and pasture or wildlife post-mining land uses occurs very slowly. Full reforestation across a large mine site in such cases may not occur for hundreds of years. Because it is difficult to intercept groundwater flow, it is difficult to reconstruct free flowing streams at mountaintop removal sites. Stream chemistry monitoring efforts show significant increases in conductivity, hardness, sulfate, and selenium concentrations downstream of [mountaintop removal] operations. http://www.ilovemountains.org
Professor Pat McGinley - A Brief History of Mountaintop Removal Mining
 
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Professor Pat McGinley, Charles H. Haden II Professor of Law at West Virginia University College of Law, provides a brief outline of the history of mountaintop removal mining. He is interviewed by Steve Johnson, an environmental law professor at Mercer Law School.
Views: 73 Stephen Johnson
Mountaintop Removal Movie from iLoveMountains.org - HQ version
 
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More than 500 mountains have been destroyed by mountaintop removal coal mining. Watch this video of mountaintop removal featuring Woody Harrelson and a soundtrack featuring an original recording of "Blowin' in the Wind," sung by Willie Nelson. This video is part of the National Memorial for the Mountains, hosted by www.iLoveMountains.org.
Views: 5352 iLoveMountainsOrg
Activist Mike Roselle Continues Fight Against Destructive Coal Mining 1 of 2
 
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The Struggle Against Mountaintop Removal: Leading Activist Mike Roselle Continues Fight Against Destructive Coal Mining The Environmental Protection Agency recently dealt a blow to the coal mining industry when it delayed hundreds of mountaintop coal mining projects for a new review of their environmental impact. But the EPA decision still leaves in place hundreds of existing permits for mountaintop removal. The group Climate Ground Zero has been leading protests and peaceful direct actions against the company Massey Energy to prevent mountaintop removal at Coal River Mountain in West Virginia. We speak with leading activist Mike Roselle of Climate Ground Zero. http://www.democracynow.org/2009/4/8/the_struggle_against_mountaintop_removal_leading
Views: 298 mediagrrl9
Professor Pat McGinley - Mountaintop Removal Mining and Environmental Justice
 
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Professor Pat McGinley, Charles H. Haden II Professor of Law at West Virginia University College of Law, discusses the environmental justice implications of mountaintop removal mining. He is interviewed by Steve Johnson, an environmental law professor at Mercer Law School.
Views: 41 Stephen Johnson
Coal 101: What's Wrong with Coal?
 
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http://www.beyondcoal.org From mining, to burning, to disposal, coal is wreaking havoc on our health and our planet. Powering our country by burning coal is dangerous. It's time to transition Beyond Coal to clean, renewable sources of energy. Learn more and take action on our website http://www.beyondcoal.org - Founded by legendary conservationist John Muir in 1892, the Sierra Club is now the nation's largest and most influential grassroots environmental organization -- with more than two million members and supporters. Our successes range from protecting millions of acres of wilderness to helping pass the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and Endangered Species Act. More recently, we've made history by leading the charge to address climate disruption by moving away from the dirty fossil fuels and toward a clean energy economy. Visit us here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SierraClub Twitter: https://twitter.com/sierraclub Instagram: https://instagram.com/sierraclub
Views: 133504 NationalSierraClub
OSM expects its rulemaking to trim 7,000 coal mining jobs in 22 states
 
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1/27/2011 - Peter Mail, a spokesman for the surface mining reclamation office, said the proposal's aim is "to better strike the balance between protecting the public and the environment while providing for viable coal mining." Mali said the document is the first working draft that was shared with state agencies, which are giving their comments on it. (More) http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=133248892 1/26/2011 - The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement document says the agency's preferred rules would impose standards for water quality and restrictions on mining methods that would affect the quality or quantity of streams near coal mines. The office, a branch of the Interior Department, estimated that the protections would trim coal production to the point that an estimated 7,000 of the nation's 80,600 coal mining jobs would be lost. Production would decrease or stay flat in 22 states, but climb 15 percent in North Dakota, Wyoming and Montana. . . . West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection official Thomas Clarke told the Associated Press on Wednesday. "I've had OSM technical people who are concerned with stream impacts and outside contractors for OSM who are subcontractors on the EIS give me their opinion that the whole thing's a bunch of junk." (More) http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5j4JC7Gs3f7cpoJMK1xc-iveOoZ7Q?docId=1b0c534404754dc7a452ff23f9b3194d Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar commended the employees of the Office of Surface Mining on November 19, 2010, for their efforts to improve oversight of state surface coal-mining operations. In the past 12 months the Office of Surface Mining has increased the number of oversight inspections to evaluate how each state is administering its regulatory program. This a clip from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6WSvVpdm-w ---- 12/27/2010 - http://www.register-herald.com/todaysfrontpage/x258589936/What-s-in-a-name-Mountaintop-removal-vs-mountaintop-development (Excerpt) "In my mind, mountaintop 'removal' implies the site is mined and then left barren, lifeless and flattened. This couldn't be further from the truth," said Chris Hamilton of the West Virginia Coal Association. He points to the mining permit requirement that forces miners to restore the mines to their approximate original contour or to configure the land for an "alternate use." Restoring the land occurs in about 90 percent to 95 percent of former surface mines, Hamilton said. "We rebuild the mountain peak, resculpting it to approximately as close as possible to the original premining topography of the land, then we reseed it with grasses and trees," Hamilton said. However, Vivian Stockman, an organizer for the Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition, told West Virginia Public Broadcasting that a flyover of the southern West Virginia coalfields suggests little development on former surface mine sites. "If they're hoping to, you know, create shopping malls on some of these, I don't know where they're going to get all the shoppers," she said. "All the communities around these areas have been driven away." She added that the notion that West Virginia needs more flat land is a myth. "Back in 2002 we had some volunteers create some maps for us," she said. "There were just massive amounts of land that are not, in any way, shape or form, developed." Researchers from the Natural Resources Defense Council found that about 1.2 million acres and about 500 mountains were flattened by surface mining in central Appalachia. An aerial imagery analysis by NRDC found that about 90 percent of mountaintop removal sites were not converted to economic uses. Only about 4 percent of West Virginia and Kentucky mountaintops had been redeveloped, NRDC found. --- 11/18/2010 - Salazar Commends OSM Initiatives to Improve Oversight of State Surface Coal Mining Programs - http://www.doi.gov/news/pressreleases/Salazar-Commends-OSM-Initiatives-to-Improve-Oversight-of-State-Surface-Coal-Mining-Programs.cfm --- In June 2009, the U.S. Department of the Interior (Interior Department) entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to reduce the harmful environmental impacts of coal mining in six states in central Appalachia. Through the MOU, the three agencies intend to strengthen oversight and regulation and minimize the adverse environmental consequences of mountaintop removal mining. (More) http://www.osmre.gov/topic/Oversight/SCM/SCM.shtm
Views: 190 rhmooney3
Independent Lens | Deep Down | Virtual Mine | PBS
 
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http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/deep-down/ Step into a virtual mining town in Second Life. Premiering Tuesday, November 23. Check local listings: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/broadcast.html Deep in the Appalachian mountains of eastern Kentucky, Beverly May and Terry Ratliff find themselves at the center of a contentious community battle over a proposed mountaintop removal coal mine. DEEP DOWN puts a human face on the consequences of our environmental impact. Any exploration of power production in America will lead to Appalachia, a region that has supplied our nation with coal for over a century. As America's energy consumption rises, the extraction and burning of coal to meet these demands has dramatically altered the Appalachian landscape, economy, and culture. Mountaintop removal mining has stripped swaths of the ancient hills down into barren, flat-topped environmental catastrophes. Coal is the number one industry here, with an enormous influence on local economies and people. Simultaneously, Appalachia as a region deserves our attention as a place of history, complexity, and change. It is time for us to look back to this "forgotten" region. We must trace the power lines from our homes to people far removed from our daily lives. Find out more about DEEP DOWN: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/deep-down/ Learn more about "Independent Lens": ‪http://www.pbs.org/independentlens‬ Watch "Independent Lens" films online: http://video.pbs.org/program/1218239994/
Views: 2099 PBS
The Health Impacts of Coal
 
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Polluting our air, water, and land, coal production and usage profoundly affects our environment. Clean air, clean water - our birthright? This previews the documentary: Burning the Future: Coal in America directed by David Novack. This compelling documentary explores the effects the nation's coal dependency has on the residents of the Appalachian states, a region plagued by toxic water, devastating floods and disappearing mountain ranges. Novack's cameras observe West Virginian activists mount a seemingly impossible battle against the U.S. government-backed coal industry to save their families, their communities and their way of life.
Views: 8198 SustainableGuidance
Independent Lens | Deep Down | Clip 3 | PBS
 
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http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/deep-down/ While voices opposed to the mining prevail, Terry Ratliff describes the victory as bittersweet. Premiering Tuesday, November 23. Check local listings: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/broadcast.html Deep in the Appalachian mountains of eastern Kentucky, Beverly May and Terry Ratliff find themselves at the center of a contentious community battle over a proposed mountaintop removal coal mine. DEEP DOWN puts a human face on the consequences of our environmental impact. Any exploration of power production in America will lead to Appalachia, a region that has supplied our nation with coal for over a century. As America's energy consumption rises, the extraction and burning of coal to meet these demands has dramatically altered the Appalachian landscape, economy, and culture. Mountaintop removal mining has stripped swaths of the ancient hills down into barren, flat-topped environmental catastrophes. Coal is the number one industry here, with an enormous influence on local economies and people. Simultaneously, Appalachia as a region deserves our attention as a place of history, complexity, and change. It is time for us to look back to this "forgotten" region. We must trace the power lines from our homes to people far removed from our daily lives. Find out more about DEEP DOWN: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/deep-down/ Learn more about "Independent Lens": ‪http://www.pbs.org/independentlens‬ Watch "Independent Lens" films online: http://video.pbs.org/program/1218239994/
Views: 1106 PBS
Silas House: Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining
 
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The Southern Environmental Law Center (SELC) was pleased to host award-winning author Silas House at the Virginia Festival of the Book in March 2011. Silas spoke about the tragic impacts of mountaintop removal coal mining on the rural communities and natural landscape of Appalachia.
Views: 405 selcva
Matt Wasson - The True Cost of Mountaintop Removal
 
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Matt Wasson is an ecologist, and he sees a problem. Every week in Appalachia, West Virginia, mountaintops are blown up to get coal. This fills the air with toxic dust clouds and lowers the water quality for those living around the mountains. But it’s not just an issue for the immediate vicinity. “The idea of blowing up these mountains to power our light switches is a very sad prospect,” Matt says. Coal companies blow up the mountaintops, but we can’t afford to be wasteful and careless in how we produce and consume energy any longer. We must take responsibility for our actions toward nature and the effect they will have on future generations. We must protect our mountains. And that’s exactly what Matt, director of programs for Appalachian Voices, plans to do. Join the award-winning online campaign he created, and stand up to stop mountaintop removal coal mining on http://iLoveMountains.org. -- Produced by Wanderlust Festival (http://wanderlust.com) Filmed and edited by: Circus Picnic (http://circuspicnic.com/) Filmed at Wanderlust Snowshoe 2015 Additional footage: (http://appalachianvoices.org)
Views: 1618 Wanderlust
Professor Pat McGinley - Mountaintop Removal Mining Litigation Stories
 
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Professor Pat McGinley, Charles H. Haden II Professor of Law at West Virginia University College of Law, discusses some of the challenges involved in litigating mountaintop removal mining cases. He is interviewed by Steve Johnson, an environmental law professor at Mercer Law School.
Views: 27 Stephen Johnson
Pat McGinley - Representing Communities Affected by Mountaintop Removal Mining
 
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Professor Pat McGinley, Charles H. Haden II Professor of Law at West Virginia University College of Law, discusses his experiences representing communities affected by mountaintop removal mining. He is interviewed by Steve Johnson, an environmental law professor at Mercer Law School.
Views: 43 Stephen Johnson
Fighting Mountain Top Removal (MTR) coal mining - a bargin with the devil
 
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From Bill Moyers Journal, below is the link to full 17 minutes. Mining Gone Wild....from the Griles Gone Wild Collection by Cartoonist Mark Fiore, 2005 - http://www.markfiore.com/animation/wild.html Americans Who Tell the Truth: Judy Bonds http://www.americanswhotellthetruth.org/pgs/portraits/Judy_Bonds.php Julia "Judy" Bonds, The Goldman Prize Winner - North America, 2003 http://www.goldmanprize.org/node/84 http://www.voanews.com/english/news/a-13-a-2003-05-25-4-Coal-66850107.html?refresh=1 http://www.grist.org/article/slaughter/ http://www.ohvec.org/links/news/archive/2003/fair_use/04_18.html http://www.ohvec.org/galleries/people_in_action/2003/04_14/index.html 1/4/2010 - Mourning the loss of Jula "Judy" Bonds http://www.latimes.com/news/science/environment/la-me-judy-bonds-20110108,0,1499385.story (Excerpt) "We love our life in the hollows," Bonds told a Times reporter in 2002. "There is nothing like being in the hollows. You feel snuggled. You feel safe. It seems like God has his arms around you." After winning the national Goldman prize, Bonds told the Associated Press that her activism arose from the day her grandson stood in the stream her family had enjoyed for six generations with his little fists full of dead fish — and dead fish floating all around. "'What's wrong with these fish?' he asked. That day I knew that if I didn't do something, that would be the future of our children," she said. http://blogs.wvgazette.com/coaltattoo/2011/01/04/coalfield-residents-mourn-loss-of-judy-bonds/ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jeff-biggers/thousands-pay-tribute-to_b_804001.html Tribute to Judy Bonds (Excerpts from Coal Country documentary) http://tinyurl.com/2vmfp3t Before the Mountain Was Moved documentary (1969) - surface coal mining in WV http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QA8u9Q3wX-0 Bo Webb of Coal River, WV and Appalachia Rising http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PwmXOoHWvUQ The Colbert Report, 1/18/2010 If a diamond is a girl's best friend then coal is its hotter younger sister. Turning boring tree-covered mountains into exciting lifeless moon bases Margaret Palmer, a professor of biology at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Studies. Palmer discusses the environmental and health consequences of mountaintop removal, and why going a more traditional route would not only help the environment, but increase employment. http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/261997/ Dishonorable James Steven Griles - http://groups.google.com/group/bob-mooney/web/dishonorable-james-steven-griles Bill Moyers Journal, 9/7/2007 http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/09072007/watch3.html (17 minutes) http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/09072007/profile.html http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/video/flv/generic.html?s=moyj06s903q18b
Views: 7415 rhmooney3
The Last Mountain
 
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In the valleys of Appalachia, a battle is being fought over a mountain. It is a battle with severe consequences that affect every American, regardless of their social status, economic background or where they live. It is a battle that has taken many lives and continues to do so the longer it is waged. It is a battle over protecting our health and environment from the destructive power of Big Coal. The mining and burning of coal is at the epicenter of America's struggle to balance its energy needs with environmental concerns. Nowhere is that concern greater than in Coal River Valley, West Virginia, where a small but passionate group of ordinary citizens are trying to stop Big Coal corporations, like Massey Energy, from continuing the devastating practice of Mountain Top Removal. The citizens argue the practice of dynamiting the mountain's top off to mine the coal within pollutes the air and water, is responsible for the deaths of their neighbors and spreads pollution to other states. Yet, regardless of evidence supporting these claims, Big Coal corporations repeat the process daily in the name of profit. Massive profit allows Big Coal to wield incredible financial influence over lobbyists and government officials in both parties, rewrite environmental protection laws, avoid lawsuits and eliminate more than 40,000 mining jobs, all while claiming to be a miner's best friend. As our energy needs increase, so does Big Coal's control over our future. This fact and a belief that America was founded on the democratic principal that no individual or corporation owns the air and water and we all share the responsibility of protecting it, drives these patriotic citizens and their supporters from outside of Appalachia, like Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., to keep fighting.A passionate and personal tale that honors the extraordinary power of ordinary Americans when they fight for what they believe in, THE LAST MOUNTAIN shines a light on America's energy needs and how those needs are being supplied. It is a fight for our future that affects us all. Written, directed and produced by Bill Haney, an award-winning documentary filmmaker and founder and president of the eco-housing start-up, Blu Homes, THE LAST MOUNTAIN was co-written and edited by Peter Rhodes and produced by Clara Bingham and Eric Grunebaum. Narrated by William Sadler, the film features original music by composer Claudio Ragazzi and includes the song "Your Control" by Crooked Fingers and Neko Case. Category:
Views: 437928 TheDisinfector2
Independent Lens | Deep Down | Clip 1 | PBS
 
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http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/deep-down/ While community opposition to the mine grows, friends still argue over what's best. Premiering Tuesday, November 23. Check local listings: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/broadcast.html Deep in the Appalachian mountains of eastern Kentucky, Beverly May and Terry Ratliff find themselves at the center of a contentious community battle over a proposed mountaintop removal coal mine. DEEP DOWN puts a human face on the consequences of our environmental impact. Any exploration of power production in America will lead to Appalachia, a region that has supplied our nation with coal for over a century. As America's energy consumption rises, the extraction and burning of coal to meet these demands has dramatically altered the Appalachian landscape, economy, and culture. Mountaintop removal mining has stripped swaths of the ancient hills down into barren, flat-topped environmental catastrophes. Coal is the number one industry here, with an enormous influence on local economies and people. Simultaneously, Appalachia as a region deserves our attention as a place of history, complexity, and change. It is time for us to look back to this "forgotten" region. We must trace the power lines from our homes to people far removed from our daily lives. Find out more about DEEP DOWN: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/deep-down/ Learn more about "Independent Lens": ‪http://www.pbs.org/independentlens‬ Watch "Independent Lens" films online: http://video.pbs.org/program/1218239994/
Views: 1588 PBS
BILL MOYERS JOURNAL | Mountaintop Mining | PBS
 
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Christians and the environment. As proposed new rules may allow coal companies to expand mountain top removal mining, Bill Moyers Journal takes viewers to the mountains of West Virginia, which are being stripped for their coal with often disastrous environmental consequences for surrounding communities, to report on local evangelical Christians who are turning to their faith to help save the earth. The program airs Friday, Sept. 7 at 9 p.m. on PBS. To watch online visit: http://wwww.pbs.org/moyers Check your local listings at: http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/about/airdates.html
Views: 2366 PBS
Photojournalist Antrim Caskey on West Virginias Fight Against Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining 2 of 2
 
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# . # Dragline We Are Tearing Down Our Mountains: Photojournalist Antrim Caskey on West Virginias Fight Against Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining The Environmental Protection Agency took a significant step last week toward blocking one of Appalachias largest and most disputed mountaintop removal coal mines. On Friday the EPA proposed a veto of the Clean Water Act permit issued by the Army Corps of Engineers for the Spruce No. 1 Mine in West Virginia. Earlier this month, we interviewed Antrim Caskey, a photojournalist who has been chronicling the nonviolent fight against mountaintop removal coal mining. Her new book is Dragline.
Views: 307 AlJalHal
Photojournalist Antrim Caskey on West Virginias Fight Against Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining 1 of 2
 
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We Are Tearing Down Our Mountains: Photojournalist Antrim Caskey on West Virginias Fight Against Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining The Environmental Protection Agency took a significant step last week toward blocking one of Appalachias largest and most disputed mountaintop removal coal mines. On Friday the EPA proposed a veto of the Clean Water Act permit issued by the Army Corps of Engineers for the Spruce No. 1 Mine in West Virginia. Earlier this month, we interviewed Antrim Caskey, a photojournalist who has been chronicling the nonviolent fight against mountaintop removal coal mining. Her new book is Dragline.
Views: 209 AlJalHal
Coal keeps grasp on West Virginia despite environment concerns
 
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As the US tries to pave the way in climate protection, the country's coal production has been on the decline. In addition to the environmental impact coal mining has left, communities are now feeling the economic effects of this recent shift.
Views: 2205 AFP news agency

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